My Honda Rebel Tour Started Great, and Found Some Problems.

Getting ready to leave on my Honda Rebel

So I was all set and ready to start heading for Chicago, though I swung by my friend Shelley’s place on the way down, got her to ride her Interceptor with me, and we had lunch in Ann Arbor.

I looked like I had a lot of stuff packed, but the bag behind my back was holding layers upon layers, all of which I can wear at the same time when it’s extremely cold, plus underwear and socks. The back of everything was the sleeping bag, sleeping pad, tent, LED lantern, and bike cover. The top was my laptop bag. The tank bag had gloves and incidentals (and coffee and water). The saddlebags held extra bungee cords, extension cords, cooking stuff, and rain gear. So I don’t think I was overpacked, really. I didn’t have extras of anything, just what I think I need to keep myself warm.

I didn’t have much issue, except I was having problems with my laptop bag sliding down to the right. After a few stops to fix it I changed how it was being held. It was mostly an issue of where I had the bungee cords attached.

Shelley and I then got on I-94W and it was nice out. I wish I had a picture of us on the road. For it to be perfect, there would need to be a couple less trucks trying to pass each other with a 1 mph difference.

Problems

The hills up and down were handled pretty good by my Honda Rebel. I shifted into fourth going up hill and back to fifth coming down hill, since fourth gear takes the climb better. I hit a false neutral between fourth and fifth at one point, which was a little scary, but nothing too bad, just threw it back into fifth and shifted into fourth again.

About five minutes afterward, I heard a mix between a pop and a clunk sound, and then ticking. Think really loud valve noise that is reminiscent of a baseball card hitting bicycle spokes. Shelley motioned for us to pass this truck and I shook my head “no” and pointed to the exit that conveniently appeared to the right. We went to this abandoned gas station parking lot where it seemed that nobody would want to bother us. There were a couple trucks there, presumably with sleeping drivers in their cabs.

So I had to deal with the new problems now, and luckily I had Shelley’s help. See what happens next here: Road Side Fixes — Will They Work?

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